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THE ALASKA RAILROAD’S TALKEETNA-TO-HURRICANE RUN OFFERS GREAT SCENERY– AND WHERE ELSE CAN YOU FLAG DOWN A TRAIN ?

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TALKEETNA, Alaska -This is a train trip that can hardly rival the Siberian Railway, the Orient Express or any of the world’s other great rail journeys. After all, this is a trip that’s only 54.7 miles long.

But incredible scenery is the attraction on the Alaska Railroad’s local flag stop service that will carry people, luggage, camping supplies, building materials and most anything else you can haul aboard through some of this nation’s most isolated, rugged and beautiful land.ALASKA TALKEETNA-38-

Alaska’s flag stop service is the only one in the country. Tell the engineer where you want to get off, and he’ll stop there – anywhere. Flag him down with a white cloth and he’ll pick you up on the return trip. It’s more like an intracity bus than a train.

But for people living in this area of Alaska, where there are no roads, no trails, no flat spots big enough to land a plane, it’s the only way in or out.

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Tourists are welcome, but the flag stop service is mostly for locals and visitors who want to get completely away from it all for a few days. Ask conductor Gary Knutson if there will be any narration along the way, and he says, ”Once in a while someone will yell, ‘Bear!’ but that’s about it.”

breaktime

ALASKA TALKEETNA-36-The route starts in Talkeetna, a SHOE-1funky town of about 600 people (think Bisbee hauled about 2,900 miles north) that is the jumping-off spot for climbers determined to scale Mount McKinley, the highest peak in North America. The train turns around less than 60 miles north at Hurricane, nothing more than a train maintenance building.

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The flag stop train is a one-car, self-contained, selfpropelled unit – a combination locomotive, passenger and baggage car in one.

Three-quarters of the trip parallels the broad Susitna River, which provides unlimited opportunities for hiking, camping and fishing.

Many of the visitors that ride the flag stop, hauling aboard enough stuff to equip a good-size sporting goods store, don’t really know where they want to go. ”They’ll ask us to drop them off at a good spot for fishing or whatever, and we usually have some suggestions,” said Knutson.

ALASKA-3High school ROTC students  disembark  to live off the land.

On this trip, a squadron of Junior ROTC cadets from a high school in Hawaii were aboard with their leader, heading for a five-day wilderness experience. The leader had some idea where he wanted to go, and engineer Pete Hackenberger accommodated their request, stopping the train in what appeared to be the middle of nowhere as the cadets unloaded their gear and hiked into the thick forest growing right up to the tracks.

 

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Hunter and guide Gary Prichard watches Alaska slip by the window as his dog Ginger enjoys the dry ride. Dropped off in the middle of nowhere, two Alaskan schoolkids (below) prepare to float 40 miles down the Susenta River to Talkeetna.

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Despite ominous signs warning of federal laws forbidding passengers from entering the engineer’s compartment, operation of the flag stop train is pretty casual. Hackenberger usually runs the train in a ”uniform” of T-shirt and shorts during the summer, frequently bringing his dog, Bear, with him for company.

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Hackenberger and Knutson know everyone who lives along the Talkeetna-Hurricane route. Several people who have built cabins far from any sign of civilization have used the train and another larger freight that plies the same tracks to haul in their homes, piece by piece.

ALASKA-2Engineer Pete Hackenberger says the Talkeetna-to-Hurricane run is the best job on Alaska’s rails.

At one point along this run, Hackenberger slowed the train and sounded the whistle. A man emerged from the underbrush and Hackenberger waved and tossed him a pack of cigarettes as he went by, fulfilling a request from the day before.

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”People are really nice along here,” Knutson said. ”You really get to know them. One guy flagged us down and gave us a covered skillet. It was filled with blueberry pie. So we ate the pie and dropped off the skillet on the next trip.”

On the way back to Talkeetna, three fishermen with their dog flagged down the train for a lift back to town. Hackenberger and Knutson climbed down to help them lift their equipment into the train.

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‘No fish and you still have beer?” Hackenberger asked as he lifted a heavy cooler. ”You didn’t read the manual. We might not let you on.”

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It is not unusual to see eagles, bear and other wildlife. On this trip, a large moose and her two calves bounded away from the tracks as the train approached. If the weather is good, there are spectacular views of Mount McKinley from the train.

”There certainly are worse jobs,” said Hackenberger. ”I think this is some of the most specular scenery anywhere.”

by MARK KIMBLE

 

 

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MORE ALASKA PHOTOS … SOUTHWESTPHOTOBANK ALASKA GALLERY

TALKEETNA, ALASKA TO HURRICANE GULCH

THE BEST WAY TO SEE ALASKA – IS BY ALASKA RAILROAD…

Flag Stop Service Schedule: During the summer, the train runs Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Runs are far less frequent during the winter. The train leaves Talkeetna about noon and returns about 6 p.m.

Fares: The Talkeetna-Hurricane  55 mile route is $100 for adults roundtrip  More info: 1 (800) 544-0552 or 907-277-4321 for trip planning expert

 

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THE LANGUAGE ON THE ROCKS : WAS THE FLUTE-PLAYING KOKOPELLI, A TRADER, DIPLOMAT, TEACHER OR WITCH ? DID ROCK DRAWINGS REVEAL THE SECRETS OF THE COSMOS AND THE FACE OF EARLY MAN?

The Battle of the ATLATL's these spear-throwers extended the arm increasing the leverage extending the throw.

The Battle of the ATLATL’s these spear-throwers extended the arm increasing the leverage extending the throw.

Sego Canyon Fremont Rock Art Panel, Utah

DOES THIS ROCK DRAWING PUT A FACE on prehistoric man in Utah 2,000 years ago, did this Sego Canyon Fremont rock art bring us face to face with our past ? In fact, doesn’t everyone have a Uncle Bob that looks just like this ?

The successful hunt meant meat for everyone. The bow and arrow and horse mounted rider dates this drawing to after 1540 AD

BIGHORNS are strong magic and preferred game

BIGHORNS were strong magic and preferred game

South West Rock Art scattered throughout the canyons, washes and gullies of today’s American West Landscape may be the first written language on this continent. For centuries man has wondered about the thoughts and messenages expressed on these rocks, we know these early rock artists were preoccupied with subsistence living, “the successful hunt” moved their world forward. So ritual drawings of game, might be followed by a shadow hunt including spearing the drawn game in anticipation of the real-time experience. Their Gods showed ancient man how to live in harmony with the land, so did their rock art depicted their God? The Devil and the spirit helpers who do their bidding, like the Kachina, who teach and whose arrival signals the time to plant or harvest and a number of ritual responsibilities of the clans of the Pueblo people.

CRACK-IN-THE-ROCK RUIN NORTH OF FLAGSTAFF AZ

CRACK-IN-THE-ROCK RUIN NORTH OF FLAGSTAFF AZ

HOPI says the first people emerged into the
Fourth World from the belly-button of the Earth
each was handed a tablet, with a tribe of birth; like Hopi, Zuni, Pawnee, or Ute and each was given a clan to be born to. All emerged through the same Sipapu their ancient ancestors had first exited from to enter the present world. No one really knows when that was, but Bible scholars says the Garden of Eden bloomed 50,000 years ago and everyone believes North and South America was peopled from the Bering Strait when big game hunters followed their game over the legendary land bridge about the same time geology-wise. Today several studies show an infusion of people into North America could have been supplemented from the sea earlier.

Newspaper Rock, Utah

Newspaper Rock, Utah

but many Native American Oral Histories report their hunters following the mastodons into the frozen north where their stone tool weapons caused a gradual decline in the mastodon populations, the large beasts all bleeped out with the mass extinction caused when an asteroid hit the ocean, blocking out the sun and killing off all Pleistocene megafauna as a result of rapid climate change. UA Archaeologist Vance Haynes coined the term “black mat” for a layer of 10,000-year-old black soil seen in many North American archaeological studies and presumed to be residue from that massive explosion off South America.

Rock Art, images pecked from rock, can’t be dated but the patina (varnish) formed on a rock gives some idea of age. Painted rock art, however offers some chance of judging the age of a petroglyph by carbon dating chips of paint. Further dating can be done by dating associated material culture but deposited artifacts can be dropped any time and many sites are visited continuously over time, some are added to, others are subtracted from.

NEWSPAPER ROCK in south central Utah reflects the world view of the pre-Puebloan People

NEWSPAPER ROCK in south central Utah reflects the migratory world view of the ancestors of today’s Pueblo People.

Julian Hayden, judged by many the best field investigator in American Archaeology, worked on both of the legendary Snaketown digs, where he met Pima elders who allowed him to sit in on a three day telling of their (Pima) oral history. Hayden found himself working all day on the dig, listening to the Pima accounting of their past much of the night, then going home and writing it up before work. The Pima Oral History spoke of the first people settling there, but others moved on and over centuries, which became hundreds of years, these first

HAYDEN reported also the Oral History said that a people from the southeast had attacked and destroyed the "great houses" of the Salt-Gila Complex or the Hohokam Canal and Platform Communities. Hayden took that to mean the Sobaipuri Indians of the Upper San Pedro River Valley, southeastern Arizona

HAYDEN reported also the Oral History said that a people from the southeast had attacked and destroyed the “great houses” of the Salt-Gila Complex or the Hohokam Canal and Platform Communities. Hayden took that to mean the Sobaipuri Indians of the Upper San Pedro River Valley who once lived in southeastern Arizona.

people eventually reached land’s end in South America. They settled but eventually new starts began making their way back north, and oddly enough, they found people speaking their own language.
Sharing some common language its not surprising but to find MesoAmerican influence scattered throughout the American South West and many studies have wondered out loud how much sway the larger civilizations held over the frontier, others have found direct connections between these prehistoric pioneers and Central and South America Civilizations. We find bells forged in Mexico, Macaws from South America, ball courts and Trincheras sites where black volcanic mountains are terraced and take the look of a lush pyramid in a dusty desert.
KOKOPELLI, the watersprinkler brought Spring

KOKOPELLI, the watersprinkler brings Spring

Trade goods, pots, dyes and fabrics might have been the sort of merchandise Kokopelli or a trader might have carried to each village or traded to lone outposts he encountered along his way. His flute would entertain, he would share new ideas, speak of change on the horizon. The South West rock art expert, Polly Schaafsma, first introduced me to Kokopelli on the Utah banks of the San Juan River. Since that first encounter I have photographed the flute-player on the banks of the Little Colorado River just outside of Springerville, Az. I have found Kokopelli hiding amongst the boulders lining a tributary of the Rio Grande south of Santa Fe, NM. Kokopelli has become an old friend, and a personal link to the past. I have found him lying flat on his back, blowing his horn against the canyons walls on the Navajo Reservation, you find him today from central Utah to central Arizona, often with a hard-on, he is most easily found where the Anasazi once lived.

CHINLE WASH, NORTHERN ARIZONA ON THE NAVAJO RESERVATION

CHINLE WASH, NORTHERN ARIZONA ON THE NAVAJO RESERVATION


In central Arizona where Kokopelli first showed up on pottery in the Hohokam village of Snaketown along today’s Gila River. In Pueblo myths, Kokopelli carries seeds, babies, and blankets to offer the maidens he seduces. According to the Navajo, his hump was made of clouds filled with seeds and rainbows. In the Hopi village of Oraibi, they believe he carried deer skin shirts and moccasins which he used to barter for brides or babies which he left with the young women. Others believe that Kokopelli’s sack contained the seeds of all the plants and flowers in the world, which he scattered each Spring. Legend tell us, everyone in the village would sing and dance throughout the night when they heard Kokopelli play his flute. The next morning, every maiden in the village would be with child. KOKOPELLICampers still report hearing the haunting, sweet flute sounds floating on the wind along the San Juan River, particularly near Chinle Wash, home to the Navajo’s watersprinkler, the god of fertility and the giver of rain. When Kokopelli played his flute, the sun came out, the snow melted, grass began to grow, birds began to sing, and all the animals gathered around to hear his songs. His flute music soothed the Earth and made it ready to receive his seed.

San Ildefonso Pueblo legend, believed Kokopelli’s flute brought happiness, joy and embodied everything pure and spiritual about music. Kokopelli was a wandering minstrel they believe who carried songs on his back, trading new songs for old ones. According to this legend, Kokopelli brought good luck and prosperity to anyone who listened to his music.

A 18x30 inch 300mm lens slice of a rock art panel at Sand Island near Bluff Utah

A 18×30 inch 300mm lens slice of a rock art panel at Sand Island near Bluff Utah

My most interesting flute-player experience came in the form of a 300mm lens slice of a large rock art panel at Sand Island just south of Bluff Utah. This view showed a flute-playing mountain sheep carved in rock in the midst of the Navajo Nation this rock art is an remnant of the ANASAZI prehistoric culture and this isolated view is only 18 inches by 30 inches sliced from a rock art panel on a 150’ cliff beside the San Juan River. Most of that 150 foot cliff is rock art, this is simply a paragraph.

The detail appeared to me as very unique — a Mountain Goat playing the flute, like Kokopelli, so I pulled this view in with my 300mm lens and thought no more about it until one day when I visited Edgar Perry, a White Mountain Apache Medicine Man and described the panel to him from memory.EDGAR PERRY WSNAKE
Is there a crack between the two groups of sheep? he asked. Yes, I said. “That line represent the real world (topside) and the supernatural world (beneath),” he said. Topside you see two sheep walking on all fours beneath the crack you see two sheep — one standing on two legs and playing a flute and the other on all fours with a bird (raven) appearing from its head the Navajos call this, shape–shifting or perhaps, skinwalkers. The Medicine Man points out the White Sheep becoming a black Raven characterizes the battle between good and bad, right and wrong. Imagine if that much meaning can be taken from a fraction of the panel, imagine what you might learn from the entire display.

Shape-shifting as depicted in this panel is a common supernatural feature attributed to shaman,

Shape-Shifting shaman took on whatever form that was needed.

Shape-Shifting shaman took on whatever form that was needed.

who legend says can become any creature necessary to their purpose–a raven could cover great distances and spy on ones enemy, and a flute-playing sheep was probably a big draw for Kokopelli when he blew into a platform mound with a new line of goods. But honestly, the sheep was Kokopelli and the shaman in him just preferred hooves for the rock prehistoric roads he traveled.

North American’s rock art began long before the birth of Christ, and continues today. It’s function varies all over the South West. North to New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon, a rock wall there has a series of lines in a single panel said to mark the coming of the summer equinox, a sun dagger is said to mark the coming and going of summer. Elsewhere in Chaco’s back country another panel is said to depict a 10th century Super Nova seen around the world in the prehistoric sky. Is Kokopelli, the flute-player, the first “Kilroy was here” ? Or does this tradition depict another tradition of Mesoamerican traders who plied the prehistoric pathways of yesteryear carrying trade goods, news, entertainment and their own special DNA.

CRACK-IN-THE-ROCK RUIN

CRACK-IN-THE-ROCK RUIN SUN DAGGER

What we believe is rock art is timeless, it began in Europe 50,000 years ago ! In the American South West, it is believed to be priceless. Last fall a Las Vegas nineteen year old spent nine months in jail and was fined shy of $25,000 for spray painting blue graffiti on top on Rock Art thought to date from 1100 AD. Another incident in the high Sierra, where a team of vandals using ladders, power-saws, hammers, generators–stole four mural scenes by cutting them from 15 feet high lava cliffs, damaging two others.

Incidents like the one in the high Sierra, where an audience is unlikely, sites go unmonitored and with increased human contact brings pressure, cuts to budgets and a lack of enforcement where an implicit risk exists to all the rock art panels scattered though out the South West and deep into Mexico. Many South West archaeologists, like renown rock art researcher, Polly Schaafsma who wonders if south central Utah may well have been the central heart beat of the Rock Art movement.

Mid-Utah Fremont Culture drew this panel in Sego Canyon east of the Barrier Canyon Style display in Horseshoe Canyon, which was drawn by the Anasazi ancestors of the Basket-Maker Culture

Mid-Utah Fremont Culture drew this panel in Sego Canyon east of the Barrier Canyon Style display in Horseshoe Canyon, which was drawn by the Anasazi ancestors of the Basket-Maker Culture

In a short distance, three distinct Rock Art styles, show regional similarities, the same stylized high priest shamans, each wearing similar symbols of rank and dress and all three messages deal with the shamanistic powers of the individuals who the design emulates. Throughout history, the fellow with the press (or the money or the power) has always been the person able to get his message out, so I have to believe, the Shaman illustrated on these covered rock habitation sites were sending out a message. Many of these archaic Utah Rock Arts panels, have images that are frequently two-three feet in size and some reach five or six feet. Over time, images get smaller and the message seems to be softer, less stressed and more focused on everyday things, corn, sheep, religious designs (some also seen on pottery) and while shamanistic influence was everything around 300-400 AD by around 11-1200 AD it was much less important to the rock artist then than it was at the time of Christ. But these Fremont/Anasazi farmers/hunters lived in and about the San Juan River and while they had regional similarities in dress and ornaments, the Fremont artwork was preoccupied with hunting and warfare and the Anasazi Basket-makers farmers seemed preoccupied with the supernatural. The Anasazi were perhaps seasonal visitors who had smaller family groups and were subject to living life in harmony with their world. Their Fremont neighbors hunted, competed for game and probably felt first the squeeze from marauding raiders (southern Piaute) who took their food and their family as slaves, their sites were lousy with arrow points.

BARRIER CANYON SHAMAN

BARRIER CANYON’S HOLY GHOST MAY BE THE MOST DRAMATIC ROCK ART PANEL ON THE COLORADO PLATEAU

Despite similarities, Polly Schaafsma suggests interesting differences; the Canyonlands Maze Unit Shaman gallery might be a portrait of all the shamans who over time have led and given direction about life, past spiritual leaders whose combined knowledge would be the fountain of understanding for all things. Unlike, other sites developed over time, this Shaman gallery in the Barrier (Horseshoe) Canyon might have been a single performance — by one artist a snapshot of the ancestors! Some paint is thought to have been blown through a straw.

Perhaps two thousand years have passed since an artist stood flat-footed and painted these drawings

Perhaps two thousand years have passed since an artist stood flat-footed and painted these drawings

Or was it a doorway for some to the Cosmos, was it an Oracle for others where they found the answer to life’s questions ? Did the Holy Ghost answer the prayers of the Anasazi Basket maker people known to be living in the area around the birth of Christ? Frequent Carbon 14 rating attempts to date this site suggest the rock art should be 2,000 years old or older.
While these shaman wear similar headgear and breastplates seen on the shaman of the Fremont People to the West, the Lower Butler Canyon Rock Art emphasized the animal helpers who worked with the shaman, the ability to hear and see what is hidden, the ability to change shape-a man becomes a mountain sheep or raven — whatever is needed. In Leslie Spier’s book “YUMAN PEOPLE” published around 1925 he interviews lots of Colorado River Tribe members who were 60-70 years old, one tale told of a shaman whose tribe was facing attack and perhaps ambush, who slept on the question and when he arose, he said he had seen the enemy camped on the other side of the mountain leading his warriors to a successful surprise attack.
Figure at left with enlarged hands may reflect a drug trip where the painter experienced hallucinations about the size of his hands.

Enlarged hands may reflect a drug trip where the painter experienced hallucinations about the size of his hands.

Hallucinogens, like Datura or Mushrooms have long been attributed to the trance experienced and to the exaggerated features shown on the Shaman. Today’s drug researchers have found subjects who take hallucinogenic mushrooms find the experience to be the most meaningful spiritual event they have ever experienced.”I was so small and everything was so big”, they report. The participant reports, “a self-awareness” and is often able to comprehend the scale of the Universe and see their small and insignificant place in the total scheme of things it was, they say, a “basically indescribable experience”. These rock art galleries held great importance for the people of their period. As time passed, rock art became less spiritual and more informational and more abstract and decorative, maybe Kokopelli was the “KILROY was here” of the time, his passing would have been worthy of note.
Kilroy' was a 46-year old shipyard worker during the war who worked as a checker at a shipyard . His job was to go around and check on the number of rivets completed. Riveters  got paid by the rivet. He would count a block of rivets and put a check mark in waxed lumber chalk, so the rivets wouldn't be counted twice. Soldiers, Sailors and Marines saw his moniker and began leaving it behind everywhere they went and soon Kilroy had liberated all of Europe before the allies had arrived.

Kilroy’ was a 46-year old shipyard worker during the war who worked as a checker at a shipyard . His job was to go around and check on the number of rivets completed. Riveters got paid by the rivet. He would count a block of rivets and put a check mark in waxed lumber chalk, so the rivets wouldn’t be counted twice. Soldiers, Sailors and Marines saw his moniker and began leaving it behind everywhere they went and soon Kilroy had liberated all of Europe before the allies had even arrived.


The Rock Art of the Anasazi Basketmaker Rock Art is still revered, perhaps even feared today, because of its potent power. Many rock art sites have been added to, over time, right up to the present. In the Chinle Wash where Tony Hillerman set the drama found in his book, "A Thief of Time" Polly Schaafsma shows us where someone has attacked a piece of rock art with an axe. The "vandal" completely destroyed the offending design, but Schaafsma suggests this may be a case of self-defense. This area of the Navajo Reservation is said to have skinwalkers who might even work with medicine men.
EARLY MAN CREATED THIS SHAMAN DRAWING BUT NAVAJO MEDICINE MAN USED AN AXE ON THIS DRAWING TO FREE HIS PATIENT

EARLY MAN CREATED THIS SHAMAN DRAWING BUT NAVAJO MEDICINE MAN USED AN AXE ON THIS DRAWING TO FREE HIS PATIENT

The destroyed rock art was an archaic design said to be used by a skinwalker for great power to place a curse on a now living Navajo, who by axing the rock, he freed himself from the skinwalkers curse. In Doug Preston’s Talking to the Ground, skinwalkers are said to shoot splinters of bone or teeth into their victims or sprinkle “corpse powder” triggering “ghost-sickness” in their victims, who then go to see the Medicine Man, who lifts the skinwalkers curse and splits the fee with the skinwalker, reservation-style free-enterprise?

POLLY SCHAAFSMA

POLLY SCHAAFSMA

“The power people perceive in these drawings, isn’t good or bad, it’s there for the using ! An evil-mined person might use the power to hex someone!”, says Polly Schaafsma. When this is done, it becomes necessary for a medicine man to break the connection by destroying the figures. If you are a witch (skinwalker) and the hex doesn’t works–it backfires on you.” So the village Shaman helped people cope and solve life’s problems, often performing shamanic feats with supernatural powers for the benefit of the group. With aid from their spirit helpers who contact the ancestors through supernatural spirits for help in curing, fertility, divining, hunting, battle and the weather.

The Lower Butler Wash site is more of a site showing shaman with their spirit helpers and displaying special abilities to see and hear and perhaps talk through spirit helpers to the nature world.

The Lower Butler Wash site shows shaman with their spirit helpers and displaying special abilities to see and hear and perhaps talk through spirit helpers or animal totem to the nature world.

The abstracted anthropomorphs with shamanistic supernatural abilities is a rock art subject repeated again and again in the canyons of the Colorado Plateau, many are surrounded or aided by “animal spirit helpers”, or demonstrate their shape-shifting skills or trance-like abilities that allow the shaman to see lost objects, the presence of evil spirits, the cause of an illness, the future and the past. The Horseshoe Canyon or Barrier Canyon site in the Maze Canyonland district could be the portrait of the principal shaman. When times got bad and resources were scarce they used magic to improve their lot. It would have been very dramatic to bring in new initiates at night with light from torches lighting up the rock art for ritual initiations, drug-assisted vision quests and for praying to your God. The name of your world means “Made for You”.

The Lower Butler Wash was chiseled by an artist pecking a straight controlled line, while the Holy Ghost Gallery was partially sprayed onto the limestone and both reflect this ghostly, ancestrial-spirit overtones which are absent in the Fremont Panels which highlight war-like motifs.

BARRIER CANYON SHAMAN

THE HOLY GHOST or EARTH GOD, door keeper to the 5th World of the Hopi and the Keeper of Fire and Master of the Fourth World (our present day world) or MASAUWV or Skeleton Man, the Spirit of Death surrounded by their helpers. This display is believed a one-time ceremony perhaps marking the doorway to the underworld or the Sipapu of all Life! Was it also entrance to both Heaven and Hell ?

HAND PRINTS APPEAR THROUGHOUT TIME RESEARCHERS BELIEVE IT WAS A WAY FOR SPIRITS TO ID WHOSE PRAYERS. ANTHROMORPHS BEGAN IN THE SAN JUAN AREA AND THE ROCK ART MOTIF SPREAD THROUGH OUT THE ANASAZI WORLD BUT AS TIME EVOLVED ROCK ART BECAME MORE STYLIZED OR DECORATIVE ALL OVER. HORSESHOE CANYON AND BARRIER CANYON ARE ONE AND THE SAME.

HAND PRINTS APPEAR THROUGHOUT TIME RESEARCHERS BELIEVE IT WAS A WAY FOR SPIRITS TO ID WHOSE PRAYERS. ANTHROMORPHS BEGAN IN THE SAN JUAN AREA AND THE ROCK ART MOTIF SPREAD THROUGH OUT THE ANASAZI WORLD BUT AS TIME EVOLVED ROCK ART BECAME MORE STYLIZED OR DECORATIVE ALL OVER. HORSESHOE CANYON AND BARRIER CANYON ARE ONE AND THE SAME.

“It’s like two different clubs were operating on separate sides of the (San Juan) river,” says Schaafsma about the similarities between the Fremont Culture Shaman Gallery and the one in Horseshoe Canyon judged to be a very old ritual site for the Anasazi Basket Maker Culture. Did the Holy Ghost figure represent the “soul force” of a departed shaman still aiding his flock from the underworld ? Schaafsma believe it was “important to do (paint) it here” beneath this 170′ high rock alcove which may have been viewed as a doorway to the supernatural world. Then there was a “ritualistic painting” which called for a ceremoniously gathering of the materials, sing song in prayer and then the painting in Horseshoe Canyon is believed to be done by one person in a single setting. In rock art an animal drawing upon completion its possible that the artist might attack it with a spear in anticipation of the hunt to come and in hopes of swaying the gods will about the outcome of the hunt.

Fremont Culture Shaman with their "spirit helpers"

Fremont Culture Shaman Drawing at Sego Canyon, Utah

FREMONT CULTURE ROCK ART AT CAPITOL REEF NATIONAL MONUMENT

FREMONT CULTURE ROCK ART AT CAPITOL REEF NATIONAL MONUMENT

Newer Rock Art does function much like the graffiti-kids spray on my neighbor’s fence, it shows their territory. Rock Art show many different styles and demonstrates a large number of cultural influences, even where one culture begins, where it begins to morph or blends with other nearby cultures or where an entirely different group begins. Over time researchers find the importance of the message changes, as does, the message. Anasazi Rock Art, like this Hohokam rock art from 1000 AD seems more casual or more graffiti-like than the much older Basket Maker archaic floating Shaman. There is an old Navajo saying that “pride and arrogance” were the downfall of the Anasazi who they believed learned too much and simply disappeared! The Navajo say “They wrote all their knowledge on the rock walls before they left, but over time it became too abstract to understand.

Newspaper Rock outside of Gila Bend AZ at Painted Rocks State Park.

Newspaper Rock outside of Gila Bend AZ at Painted Rocks State Park.

ACID RAIN has been blamed for diminishing the once dramatic rock art gallery of floating Shaman’s found on the covered back wall of an Anasazi Basketmaker II site featuring a fifty foot panel of a dozen figures in Horseshoe Canyon of the Maze District in Utah’s Canyon lands where it is feared the nearby coal-operated Page, AZ electricity generation plant has caused more deterioration in the past 20 years than seen there in the previous 2000 years. South West Rock Art might well have been the original email, a short concise message for a specific audience. Messaging has come full circle, if you buy the email you get today on your smartphone, is the rock art equivalent of a thought expressed on a prominent rock feature certain to capture the desired audience. Graffiti may also link us with those prehistoric artists and archaeologist must struggle with the question, does a nice blank surface require a creative hand to leave its mark–will man make art, regardless of what he has to say “Kilroy was Here!” for instance ? Or is the message everything ?

Prehistoric Rock Art is Disappearing ... people and pollution are the main culprits.  This famous artwork panel in North Central Baja has been destroyed by vandals drawing on the walls between the color rock paintings which were so characteristic of all of Baja's Rock Art and was once numbered among the best panels to visit.

Prehistoric Rock Art is Disappearing … people and pollution are the main culprits. This famous artwork panel in North Central Baja has been destroyed by vandals drawing on the walls between this old color rock painting so characteristic of all of Bajas’ Rock Art and was once numbered among the best panels to visit.


TEEN GETS PRISON FOR DEFACING 1000 YEAR OLD ROCK ART AND FINED….CLICK HERE

HELP PROTECT THE PAST Rock art must never be touched; oils from human skin can discolor or eventually obliterate the designs. Rock art is protected by the Archaeological resources Protection Act of 1979 and the Antiquities Act of 1906


ROCK ART OF UTAH BY POLLY SCHAAFSMA

INDIAN ROCK ART OF THE SOUTHWEST BY POLLY SCHAAFSMA
(School of American Research Southwest Indian Arts Series)

VISIT THE SECRET CANYON OF THE FREMONT PEOPLE: VIDEO OF SOME OF THE 6000 PRISTINE PREHISTORIC SITES

HANDBOOK OF ROCK ART RESEARCH BY DAVID S. WHITLEY


SOUTH WEST PHOTO BANK SOUTHWEST ROCK ART PHOTO GALLERIES….CLICK HERE

[caption id="attachment_6968" align="aligncenter" width="489"]"Baseball Man" perhaps the most intriguing rock art painting in the Chinle Wash System. “Baseball Man” perhaps the most intriguing rock art painting in the Chinle Wash System.

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SADDLEBROOK SNOW “PERFECT STORM”, WINTER-WONDERLAND MORNING, GONE BY MID-DAY…

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THIS SADDLEBROOKE GARGOYLE SHOWS LITTLE ENTHUSIASM FOR THIS CHANGE IN THE WEATHER-NO REAL FAN OF SNOW...

THIS SADDLEBROOKE GARGOYLE SHOWS LITTLE ENTHUSIASM FOR THIS CHANGE IN THE WEATHER-NO REAL FAN OF SNOW…

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While the Northeast United States is digging out of three feet of new snow and a blizzard of historic proportions — across the great divide on the opposite side of the U.S. Tucsonans awoke to a frosty white deposit on all the mountains surrounding this desert community. The Catalina Range above 9,000 feet took the biggest hit with a fancy white shawl laced down to her foothills. More surprisingly, was the dusting left on the Tortolita’s, the Tucson’s, the Santa Rita’s and the Rincon Mountains all had deep deposits on their higher peaks. Much like the song about Camelot, the rain fell during the night and was gone by daybreak, snow on all peaks is a unique event particularly when the overall temperatures were already in the fifties. Clouds kept sunshine from attacking the snow until around noon when it popped out and the snow began retreating but not before the breaking up clouds allowed the sun to spotlight the peaks setting off their snowy lids against dark backgrounds. Saddlebrooke, Arizona recently was selected as one of the best retirement communities in the United States, particularly due to its setting at the base of the Santa Catalina Range not far from the University of Arizona’s BioSphere, City of Tomorrow. The snow was a big draw and brought lots of walkers out to stride around and check out what snow does when it falls on the desert. It is very textured experience and folks can be very impressed, most remembered winters back east like today which has seized the entire eastern seaboard, shutting down businesses, keeping folks at home, stopping the trains, buses and more than 5,000 air flights. Today the east coast is paralyzed, highways shut down, folks are stranded, some without phone and power lines are down and people are again without heat and lighting–today in Tucson the sun showed itself around noon, warmed up the land and melted away all the snow. There was nothing worse back in the mid-west, three months into a long winter with the black dirty snow stacked against curb and at times in the middle of the streets and knowing you would be climbing over that ugly snow for weeks, except when it would melt quick and refreeze as a invisible glaze–that’s when things really got fun. Southern Arizona was magnificent this morning, the air was so clear you could see forever and by afternoon, it was just beautiful.

SOUTHWESTPHOTOBANK PHOTO GALLERIES: FOR MORE SNOW PICTURES…CLICK HERE

U.S. and CANADA DIG OUT OF HISTORIC SNOWSTORM, 370 THOUSAND WITHOUT POWER, 15 DEAD… CLICK HERE

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TUCSON’S NEW YEAR FROSTING, WINTER STORM BRINGS RAIN, SNOW TO SOUTHERN ARIZONA

Catalina State park received close to an inch of rain and flurries of snow.

Catalina State park received close to an inch of rain and flurries of snow.

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Grazing in Snow

Grazing in Snow

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Southern Arizona’s Sky Islands are frosted over for the 2013 New Year and new storms promise to spread snow throughout the border regions of Arizona. Forecasts predicts more, Bisbee has 9 inches, Naco has 7 inches, Sierra Vista has 3 inches and Mount Lemmon’s hwy is now open to four-wheel drive, and is a good place to screw up a nice 4×4, all that traction on ice…?
“It’s beautiful”, says a photographer at Catalina State Park, who has pulled over off the roadway to make a photo. Another lady stopped and rolled down her window, if the ranger sees you stopped on the shoulder, he will ticket you for being off road. Thanks I say as I pull away, that’s total bullshit I think.

VISIT SOUTHWEST PHOTOBANK TUCSON NEW YEAR’S SNOW……….CLICK HERE

CATALINA HIGHWAY THROUGH ORACLE ROAD IN SNOW FLURRIES

CATALINA HIGHWAY THROUGH ORACLE ROAD IN SNOW FLURRIES

SNOWBALLS ARE MEANT FOR LITTLE BROTHERS

SNOWBALLS ARE MEANT FOR LITTLE BROTHERS

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BIG SHOW JUST AROUND THE CORNER, ANNUAL FALL LEAVES STARTING EARLY IN FLAGSTAFF, WHITE MOUNTAINS LEAVES ON SCHEDULE BUT LATER

In the forest north of Greer AZ daisy’s have taken over the meadows and add a great splash of color in anticipation of the leaves changing colors.

Seems like the leaves are turning much earlier this year. Flagstaff might peak between October 10-17 while the White Mountains may better be viewed around the middle of October. The weather has been perfect– cool, but not freezing nights coupled with warm sunny days produce optimum leaf color. Aspen color is still spotty but should be showing well on the high trails this week and next in the FLAGSTAFF area and the annual colors are coming a little slower in the WHITE MOUNTAINS. In the Alpine and Greer area nights have been 40 degrees with highs around 75 each day, the monsoon has ended and the afternoon rains have slowed. In short, the weather now is perfect. Time to enjoy the fall, the light has changed and now the days have begun to grow shorter by getting light later and the sun setting earlier, still the time to camp but it’s perfect campfire weather. Many of the White Mountain communities have festivals, cars shows, art exhibits, sales planned to attract flat-landers into the mountains for the annual exodus to escape the desert heat and see the golden leave change. Many a Sunday evening in October I-17 from Flagstaff to Phoenix is a sea of tail-lights as Phoenicians navigate bumper-to-bumper traffic all the way home from Flagstaff when the weather finally changes. Not all Phoenix tourists make it all of the way to Flagstaff or Williams, many are content to hang-out, in Sedona’s Oak Creek Canyon there fall colors show itself closest to Phoenix, but that also means it is the most crowed and you have folks stepping all over you. At the peak Flagstaff’s Hart’s Prairie Road is the best drive to view the change and further east the Hanagan’s Meadow area south of Alpine, AZ will host many a nice view of Aspen golden glow.

37th Annual Fall Artisans Festival a Heritage Event – Mountain Meadow Recreation Complex, more than 80 arts and craft juried vendors, parade on Saturday at 10 am, $2, Sat 9 am – 6 pm, Sun 10 am – 3 pm, 928-367-4290 or 800-573-4031 or http://www.pinetoplakesidechamber.com
4th Annual Festival of Native American Culture in Sedona includes a special film night, Native American Invitational Art Show, entertainment, Archaeology Field Hikes, 928-567-0066 or http://www.festivalofnativeamericanculture.org
Celtic Harvest Festival Sedona – “A Celebration of the changing Light”
Sedona – Poco Diablo Resort Music, dance, master pipers, storytelling, Fairy Village for families, falcons, sheepdog herding demos, vendors, food, drink and more, $5-15, 9:30 am – 5:30 pm, http://www.celticharvestfestival.com/

6th Annual SalsaFest in Safford – Safford Town Square Sep 28 An opportunity to win prizes and bragging rights in the Salsa Challenge, live entertainment, food, salsa making contests, Festival Marketplace, Salsa music and dancing, food demos, chili roasting, kids area, and Jalapeno & Salsa eating competitions, kids’ corner with piñata bust, Fri 5-9 pm, includes a Salsa Glow, Hot Cars on the Salsa Trail, car show on Saturday, Sat. 9 am – 4 pm, 928-428-2511 or 888-837-1841 or http://www.SalsaTrail.com
Sep 29 6th Annual Prescott Pow Wow at Watson Lake Park, (3101 Watson Lake Rd, 86301), free, http://www.visit-prescott.com or http://prescottpowwow.wordpress.com or http://www.prescottpowwow.org/

Helldorado Days OCTOBER 19-21 2012 Helldorado Days in July 1881, a disgruntled miner writes the Tombstone Nugget newspaper stating that instead of finding their “Eldorado” of riches, many men ended up washing dishes or other menial jobs, finding instead, their “Helldorado”. The term stuck. Helldorado is Tombstone’s oldest festival celebrating its rip-roaring days of the 1880’s. Helldorado, started in 1929, is sponsored by Helldorado, Inc. whose membership is composed of residents in Cochise County. Helldorado is held every third weekend in October and consists of gunfight re-enactment shows, street entertainment, fashion shows and a family oriented carnival. In addition, come and watch the Annual Helldorado Parade on Sunday at 11am…

Big Lake Arizona stands above 10,000 feet….

MORE WHITE MOUNTAIN PHOTOS ON SOUTHWESTPHOTOBANK GALLERIES….CLICK HERE

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